menu

Timelapse Shutter Speed – Slow vs. Fast


On this Adorama video, photographer David Bergman takes a quick look at the effects of changing the shutter speed on the look of a timelapse video.

This quick tutorial is very simple – when you set your camera to shoot a timelapse the shutter speed will control how the movement in the image will look. Faster shutter speed means a frame by frame movement which is very hard, a slower shutter speed means a smoother movement in the frame. Remember – in both case you will need a tripod or some other way of stabilising your camera and if you are shooting long exposures during the day – you will need an ND filter.

It is important to realise that there is no right or wrong here – both slow shutter speed timelapse and fast shutter speed timelapse can look great if this is what you are trying to achieve – the idea here is to let you know how to control the look so that you can create what you need.

Photographer J. P. Morgan looked at the same topic in a recent video (see the second video here – also shot in times square by the way). we also have an introduction on shooting timelapse by Chase Kubasiak from Zacuto, another two videos by photographer Jay P. Morgan looking at shooting timelapse videos with and without movement of the camera, from different angles with his own tips on the subject and“Combining Time Lapse and Video at Sunset

We also published several other guides for shooting timelapses including a step by step one by  Corey Rich as well as a  very comprehensive guide to time-lapse photography with photographer Vincent Laforet in 3 parts (the first episode in the series here and the second video here and the 3′rd can be found here) as well as a much more basic guide by photographer Gavin Hoey called “Timelapse Photography Tutorial“.

You can watch more HDSLR and video techniques on our dedicated HDSLR channel here on LensVid.

Go to top
Shares
Read more:
The Revisit | Mick Rock and the Nikon Df
Mick Rock: The Revisit

On this video (part of a Nikon campaign for the new DF camera), famous British rock photographer Mick Rock takes a look...

Close