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Dell’s Ultrasharp UP3218K – First 32-inch 8K Display


A few years back we reported here on the Dell UP2715K – the first 5K 27 inch display – this year on CES 2017 we were presented with the first 8K monitor by Dell – the 32″ Ultrasharp UP3218K.

Update: we changed the main video to one by Linus which has more info.

4K has been around for a while and in the last couple of years prices went down and content has become more and more common. Also, almost all new cameras can shoot 4K and so there is an increasing need for supporting displays. the next big jump is going to be 8K but at the moment there is very little available content (there are a few YouTube videos in 8K) and a very small number of supporting cameras (mostly high end RED and broadcast cameras and a few manufacturers demonstrated prototypes – like the Canon camera we shot at Photokina last year).

The new Dell’s Ultrasharp UP3218K – not exactly 8K for the masses dell-8k-up3218k

 

So who needs 8K monitor right now? according to Dell – mostly professionals, architects, graphic designers, video editors who need a lot of display real estate as well as photographers – after all we are looking at over 33MP worth of display…

Here are some of the specs for the new UP3218K: 

  • Display: 31.5-inch.
  • Resolution: 7,680×4,320-pixel (280 ppi).
  • Refresh rate: 60Hz.
  • Viewing angles 178-degree.
  • Color range: 100% Adobe RGB, 100% sRGB, 100% Rec709, 98% DCI-P3 and >80 percent Rec2020.
  • Brightness: 400 cd/m2
  • Contrast:  1,300:1.
  • Bezel: 9.7 mm.
  • Connections: 2x DisplayPort (1.3), 4x USB 3.0.
  • Adjustments” tilt, pivot, swivel, height.
  • Price: $5,000 (availability – later in 2017).

Another video from CES 2017 looking at the new Dell UP3218K display

If you don’t want to miss any new photography product be sure to check out our product photography section on our photo gear channel.

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