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How to Build your Own Tethered Shooting Workstation


On this video photographer Tony Northrup shows his workstation for shooting tethered in his studio. His workflow and choice of hardware and software is worth noting if you plan on shooting tethered yourself. 

Shooting tethered gives you much better immediate feedback and control over your shoot when you are in a studio environment (although there are ways to shoot “tethered” outdoors and even shoot “Tethered” wirelessly (which sound counter intuitive but the basic principles are the same).

There are quite a few things that Northrup talks about in this video – first, he uses a tripod – you can shoot  tethered without a tripod of course but for studio work you will find out that in most cases it is more convenient. Northrup uses a manfrotto ball head and a 70-200mm lens with a collar which he keeps a bit open to change from portrait to landscape easily (nice trick). He also uses a

In the past Northrup used a laptop on a laptop table (we recently reviewed here the ClickSnap Axis 1 Laptop Table and the Tabelz SP135M Laptop Table) but eventually he moved to using a desktop with a mobile desktop stand (PC-130A) and a large (4K DELL) LCD which in many cases is less expensive but almost always stronger (and with a much larger display).

Northrup also synchronizes every image which he gets from the camera to his main workstation so that he can work on it immediately when he sits down on his editing workstation – another time saving measure. If you are wondering Northrup using the Capture One Pro 8 software and not Lightroom because it is much faster for tethered work.

We are going to do our own video on shooting using a computer/tablet in the not too distant future so stay tuned for that as well.

More guides and comparisons of photographic gear can be found on our photography gear guides – here on LensVid. If you liked Tony and Chelsea Northrup you can check out more of their videos here on LensVid.

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